The UK Stock Market Almanac Review – Stephen Eckett

HomeForumsReviewsTrading Book ReviewsThe UK Stock Market Almanac Review – Stephen Eckett

Tagged: 

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by ReviewTeam ReviewTeam 4 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2717
    ReviewTeam
    ReviewTeam
    Keymaster

    The UK Stock Market Almanac Review – Stephen Eckett

    Click image to purchase

    The UK Stock Market Almanac - Stephen Eckett

    About The Author

    Stephen Eckett read mathematics at London University and then joined Baring Securities on the Japanese equities and warrants desk. After setting up a futures operation for Barings in Hong Kong, he joined the capital markets division of Bankers Trust and organized the first listing of an index warrant in Asia. He then moved to Tokyo to set up a derivatives desk for S.G Warburg Securities. In 1993 he founded Numa Financial Systems Ltd, a training and systems consultancy company specialising in derivatives.

    On The Back Cover

    The UK Stock Market Almanac is a unique reference work providing traders and investors with the data to tackle the markets in the year ahead.

    The main section consists of 52 weekly articles focusing on a range of strategies based on original seasonality analysis. These are supplemented with facts, figures and trivia unique to the Almanac. This is an extremely valuable and informative companion to the financial year, making the Almanac the one essential book for the serious trader or investor.

    The Almanac consists of three main sections:

    1. Day-to-day financial data

    Data and statistics
    Each page of this section includes key financial dates including: important economic releases, derivative contract expiries, exchange holidays, and company resultsexpected that week. The pages also feature the results of a unique study of the historic performance of the market for each day and week of the year – the Sinclair Numbers.

    Seasonality research
    Each page of the diary is accompanied by an original, informative and entertaining article. These cover studies of trends and anomalies, seasonality analysis, momentum effects, sector performance, arbitrage opportunities, FTSE Index reviews, as well as the results of some more unusual and eye-opening research.

    2. Statistics

    A collection of articles featuring statistical analysis of UK stock market data and more wide-ranging topics than the Diary. Exclusive to the Almanac, sector, weekly and daily market performance analysis data is included.

    3. Reference

    The Reference section includes background information about UK and international stock indices. Topics covered include basic facts about the market, trade codes, a timetable of the trading day and a look at the original constituents of the FT 30 of 1935 and the FTSE 100 of 1984.

    Review

    Where to start!

    There’s two pages for each week of the year.  One page acts as a diary which highlights key financial events (e.g. UK interest rate announcements) and UK Companies reporting interim/final results that week (there’s also space for making notes!).  Opposite each diary page a fresh topic is covered each week and some of them are most enlightening.  Among my favourites:

    • Monthly/Seasonal switching strategies
    • Monthly market performance analysis – Did you know the best performing month for the FTSE is December?
    • First/Last trading day of the month analysis – Did you know that since 1984 the FTSE has risen on the first trading day of the month 60.8% of the time?

    Even if you do not incorporate these nuggets of information into your trading/investing at the very least they make for interesting light reading on a Monday morning.

    Best of all, the almanac doesn’t end there, there is an additional Statistics section followed by a Reference section.

    The Statistics section provides detailed information on the FTSE, it’s sectors and even it’s constituents.  Again, among my favourites:

    • Tuesday reverses Monday – Does it?  Since 2000 Yes but since 1984 the answer is No!
    •  “No sector has been in the top three best or worst performing sectors for more than two consecutive years”
    • RDSB reported the highest profits than any other company in the FTSE100 this year and in 2007 – It also, not surprisingly paid the most tax!

    This book really is a no brainer for me.  If you are a UK based trader/investor I can think of no other diary that should be on your Christmas list each and every year (thanks Mum, again!).

    The subtitle of the book sums it up better than I can:

    Seasonality analysis and studies of market anomalies to give you an edge in the year ahead

    Click image to purchase

    The UK Stock Market Almanac - Stephen Eckett

    You can buy this and many other Trading related books at the Systems For Traders Bookshop

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.


    Members can post and subscribe to threads like this one

    And also receive an email every time we post a new review

    Click HERE to register for FREE

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.